MCN Blogs

BYO Post-JOKER

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BYOFall

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Dad Star Man: A Review Of AD ASTRA

What if there was intelligent life at the farthest reaches of the studio system?

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BYOBlog

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How Scorsese Do You Expect JOKER To Be?

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BYOB – RIP The Goldfinch

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RIP MoviePass

Gone on Saturday.

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RIP Robert Frank

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Grown Goonies In The Boonies: A Review of IT Chapter 2

You know if you want to see it, and if you want to see it, you’ll see it, and if you have reservations about seeing it, IT Chapter 2, or, “Grown Goonies in the Boonies,” is likely not for you.

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Remembering Andrea Gronvall, Critic, Journalist, Friend, Former “Siskel & Ebert” Producer, Longtime MCN Contributor

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BYO Autumnticipation

The cognoscenti traveling to Venice and Telluride have already tut-tutted the movies of fall and are spatting those overly familiar food fights about awards. Can they beat you away with their sticks?

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BYOAutumn Movies

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“Raise A Glass To Peter” Fonda

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BYO Break In Summer Dog Day Dog Movies

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BYO Anima: Trailering HIDDEN LIFE

1. The trailer is cut to suggest that the historical moment is not then, but now. 2. Those pull-quotes are… 3. Jörg Widmer.

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BYO Ides of August

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2 Key Issues From Disney’s Q3 Fiscal Announcement

1. The only thing really left from the 20th Century Fox studio that was operating for 84 years as a major is Fox Searchlight.

Basically, they have Icahn-ed the shit out of Fox.

And the DOJ didn’t blink an eye. A major studio disappeared… and all we got was this lousy feeling of nostalgia.

2. Disney just slowed down the transition to streaming. A lot.

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BYOB: Summertime And The Living Is… Well… Living

 

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Review: Hobbs & Shaw

I have an on-again, off-again relationship with the The Fast & The Furious franchise. I remember seeing the first film in the run, directed by the ever-cinematically flatulent Rob Cohen, 18 years ago in a room somewhere at Universal that I can’t ever remember being in before or since. And it was flawed. But it was fun. And intimate. And weird. And it was great to see in-camera car stunts that we hadn’t seen in a while.

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Review: Once Upon A Time … In Hollywood (spoilers)

I’ve seen Quentin Tarantino’s 9th Film, Once Upon A Time … in Hollywood three times so far. I usually watch his films twice before writing, checking my most intense reactions against a second view. This time, I must admit that I have been trying to connect to a clearer reaction and I still am.

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MCN Videos

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D’Arcy Carden, The Good Place / Barry

The Act, Joey King

Brian Tyree Henry, If Beale St Could Talk, Widows, Spider-Man Into The Spiderverse, Atlanta

Willem Dafoe, At Eternity’s Gate

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“Well, actually, of that whole group that I call the post-60s anti-authority auteurs, a lot of them came from television. Peckinpah’s the only one whose television work represents his feature work. I mean, like the only one. Mark Rydell can direct a really good episode of ‘Gunsmoke’ and Michael Ritchie can direct a really good episode of ‘The Big Valley,’ but they don’t necessarily look like The Candidate. But Peckinpah’s stuff, even the scripts he wrote that he didn’t even direct, have a Peckinpah feel – the way I think there’s a Corbucci West – suggest a Peckinpah West. That even in his random episodes that he wrote for ‘Gunsmoke’ – it’s right there.”
~ Quentin Tarantino

“The thought is interrupted by an odd interlude. We are speaking in the side room of Casita, a swish and fairly busy Italian bistro in Aoyama – a district of Tokyo usually so replete with celebrities that they spark minimal fuss. Kojima’s fame, however, exceeds normal limits and adoring staff have worked out who their guest is. He stops mid-sentence and points up towards the speakers, delighted. The soft jazz that had been playing discreetly across the restaurant’s dark, hardwood interior has suddenly been replaced with the theme music from some of Kojima’s hit games. Harry Gregson-Williams’ music is sublime in its context but ‘Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots’ is not, Kojima acknowledges, terribly restauranty. He pauses, adjusting a pair of large, blue-framed glasses of his own design, and returns to the way in which games have not only influenced films, but have also changed the way in which people watch them. “There are stories being told [in cinema] that my generation may find surprising but which the gamer generation doesn’t find weird at all,” he says.
~ Hideo Kojima